Ellis Sotheby’s International to Host Red Carpet Gala To Benefit Local Arts Education in Hudson Valley

Real Estate In-Depth | September 2018

Pretty Penny in Nyack

NYACK—Ellis Sotheby’s International Realty reports it has teamed up with Edward Hooper House Museum & Study Center in Nyack to host a Golden Age of Hollywood-themed fundraiser on Oct. 6 from 7 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. to benefit arts education in Hudson Valley public schools.

During the last two years, Ellis Sotheby’s International Realty and Edward Hooper House raised about $50,000 to benefit arts education. The program has benefited more than 1,000 pupils, encouraging them to expand their artistic analytical skills to become more creative and explore narrative storytelling as it relates to Edward Hopper’s art, home, life experiences and influence.

The gala will be held at 235 North Broadway, Nyack (Pretty Penny), an 1858 Italianate Victorian home overlooking the Hudson River and will include dinner, dancing, a martini bar and red-carpet welcome. The dress code is red carpet glamorous.

Once owned by actress Helen Hayes, the “first lady of American theater,” and later by comedian, actress and television personality Rosie O’Donnell, the historic home was named Pretty Penny supposedly for the amount it cost to buy and maintain. Hayes and her playwright husband, Charles MacArthur, moved into the home in 1932 during the Golden Age of Hollywood. The home is currently listed for sale by Ellis Sotheby’s International Realty for $3,995,000.

Pretty Penny was painted by Edward Hopper, widely acknowledged as one of the most important painters of 20th century America. It was his only commission. It now is in the collection of the Smith College Museum of Art, Northampton, MA, Hayes’ alma mater.

Speaking of his firm’s support of Edward Hopper House, Richard Ellis, owner of Ellis Sotheby’s International Realty, said he “believes in the importance of art education, for both the emotional and educational benefits it can provide young adults and for its influence on the way they appreciate not only art, but anything aesthetic for the rest of their lives.”