Hudson Valley Advanced Manufacturing Center Designated as ‘Smart Lab’ by Major 3-D Printer

Real Estate In-Depth | August 22, 2016

SUNY New Paltz President Donald P. Christian (second from right) visited the office of Ulster County Executive Mike Hein (far left) to present him with two unique gifts produced by the Hudson Valley Advanced Manufacturing Center (HVAMC): a 3D-printed model of the county government building and a topographic map of Ulster County.

NEW PALTZ—SUNY New Paltz is the first institution of higher education to be designated a Stratasys-MakerBot Additive Research & Teaching or SMART lab by Stratasys, the largest 3D printer company in the world.

The announcement came during an open house for the Hudson Valley Advanced Manufacturing Center in June.

“Our designation as a SMART lab is a huge step for the HVAMC,” said Dan Freedman, dean of the School of Science and Engineering and HVAMC director. “The combination of our unique focus on the intersection of art, engineering and science, with this recognition and support from the world’s leading manufacturer of 3D printers, allows us to offer an unparalleled interdisciplinary educational experience, helps us support regional businesses and gives all of our students and faculty the tools to perform cutting-edge work in art, engineering and design.”

SUNY News Paltz also announced a new, 18-credit minor in digital design and fabrication—the result of a unique partnership between the Schools of Fine & Performing Arts and Science & Engineering to prepare a new generation of students to conceptualize and design for 21st century manufacturing.

“The Digital Design & Fabrication minor brings together faculty from art, engineering, design and computer science,” said Jeni Mokren, dean of the School of Fine & Performing Arts. “This gives our students access to a range of expertise that will enable them to understand the technical capabilities and restraints of advanced manufacturing, while making products that function and look good, too. It also means our graduates will be highly sought-after by employers across the region and around the world.”

SUNY New Paltz President Donald P. Christian added that the Schools of Business and Education are engaging in 3D design and printing as well. “Our students receive an unparalleled education and experience that will prepare them for the design challenges of the modern world,” he said. “Regional businesses have a valuable resource for innovation and SUNY New Paltz contributes to the broader workforce and economic development of the Hudson Valley.”

“What started as an HVEDC regional economic development initiative only four years ago has quickly evolved into a leading global technology revolution with its center based in the Hudson Valley,” said Laurence P. Gottlieb, president and CEO of Hudson Valley Economic Development Corporation. “This historic announcement by Stratasys and SUNY New Paltz will have positive repercussions for the region for decades to come.”

Andrew Winchell, director of operations for New York State Senator John Bonacic, attended the HVAMC open house to express continuing support of New Paltz’s 3D initiative on the senator’s behalf. State funding secured by the senator, in addition to a $10-million NYSUNY2020 grant and investment of institutional funds, will provide the college with a 22,000-square-foot Engineering Innovation Hub to house the 3D initiative and the college’s mechanical engineering program. The Hub is expected to open in the fall of 2019.

The HVAMC provides expert advice on the 3D printing process, materials and design for additive manufacturing to SUNY New Paltz and the Hudson Valley business community. The center’s collection of 3D printers constitutes some of the most advanced technology at any academic lab in the country and is available for the campus and the wider community.

In August, it was announced that the Hudson Valley Technology Development Center and its 11 employees and five engineering interns moved from Newburgh to 180 South St. in Highland. The HVTDC provides consultation and growth services to regional small and mid-size manufacturing and early-stage technology companies, with a special focus on engineering and product development.

“Recruiting talented engineering interns from New Paltz benefits the center and its clients, as well as the students,” said Tom Phillips, HVTDC executive director and a member of the SUNY New Paltz School of Science & Engineering Advisory Board.

The center’s move to Highland, said Phillips, will provide HVTDC better access to the SUNY News Paltz’s student talent and resources, including the Hudson Valley Advanced Manufacturing Center, which provides prototyping work to many of HVTDC’s clients.

The move also positions HVTDC to help identify and work with potential clients who might also setup operations in its new location and apply to the college for inclusion in the state’s START-UP NY program. A company under the program that occupies vacant space in the same facility will be in close proximity to HVTDC and well positioned to take advantage of the organization’s support services.

PHOTO CAPTION: SUNY New Paltz President Donald P. Christian (second from right) visited the office of Ulster County Executive Mike Hein (far left) to present him with two unique gifts produced by the Hudson Valley Advanced Manufacturing Center (HVAMC): a 3D-printed model of the county government building and a topographic map of Ulster County.